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About Us

About Us

Karen Nelson

Karen L. Nelson, recognized as a non-attorney representative handling exclusively SSI and Social Security Disability Claims, throughout the State of Oklahoma and Northern Texas. She has been helping individuals with SSI and Social Security Disability Claims for the past twelve years. She has over twenty-two years of experience in the legal field. She is a member of both the Oklahoma Organization of Social Security Claimant Representatives and the National Organization of Social Security Claimant Representatives. She is also a member of Edmond Women In Business, and a member of the Edmond Chamber of Commerce.

Karen L. Nelson is active in her community. In the past, she has been the Worthy Matron of Edmond Chapter #247, Order of the Eastern Star, and Assistant Mother Advisor of Edmond Assembly #95, International Order of the Rainbow for Girls. She is a member of First United Methodist Church of Edmond, and past-treasurer of Edmond First United Methodist Women. She is also a member of the Edmond Women’s Club.

Karen L. Nelson is devoted to her family. Married for 30 years, to Richard, an attorney, together they have three children.

Do you qualify for SS benefits?

Social Security Administration uses what they call a “Five Step Sequential Evaluation” in evaluating your claim for benefits.

Is the claimant engaging in substantial gainful activity?

Substantial gainful activity means work that involves doing significant and productive physical and mental duties and is done (or intended) for pay or profit.

Does the claimant have a severe impairment?

The impairment must result from anatomical, physiological or psychological abnormalities which can be shown by medically acceptable clinical and laboratory diagnostic techniques.

Does the claimant have an impairment that meets or equals in severity one the of medical conditions described in our Listing of Impairments?

Can the claimant do his or her past work?

If the claimant’s past work is such that the impairment would prevent performing that work, SSA goes to the final step.

Can the claimant do other work?

At this final step, SSA determines the claimant’s impairment, age, education and past relevant work experience, and the claimant’s ability to do other work in the national economy.

Social Security Facts

Disability benefits became a part of the Social Security program in 1956. The Supplemental Security Income program began in 1974. The definition of Social Security Disability is: A medical condition preventing substantial work for at least 12 months, or expected to result in death. The determination also considers age, education and work experience.

Social Security, Old Age, Survivors and Disability Insurance, is a social insurance program funded through employee and employer payroll taxes. Eligibility for all benefits turns on whether the worker earned the required number of quarters in covered employment to establish eligibility. A person may be entitled to social security disability on his or her own work record, or on the record of a deceased spouse, or on a retired, disabled or deceased parent.

Below are the five Steps to filing for Social Security benefits:

1) Initial Application

Substantial gainful activity means work that involves doing significant and productive physical and mental duties and is done (or intended) for pay or profit.

2) Reconsideration

You may request a review of your case if you disagree with SSA’s first decision.

3) Hearing

You may request a hearing before an Administrative Law Judge if you disagree with the reconsideration decision.

4) ppeals Council Review

You may request the Appeals Council to review you case if you disagree with Administrative Law Judge’s decision.

4) Federal Court

You may request an appeal through the United States Court system, starting with the United States District Court, if you disagree with the Appeals Council decision or denial of your request for review.

In addition to disability rules, SSA also has “non-disability eligibility requirements” in determining your claim.

Terms

Social Security

Social Security, Old Age, Survivors and Disability Insurance, is a social insurance program funded through employee and employer payroll taxes. Eligibility for all benefits turns on whether the worker earned the required number of quarters in covered employment to establish eligibility. A person may be entitled to social security disability on his or her own work record, or on the record of a deceased spouse, or on a retired, disabled or deceased parent.

Average Benefit Amounts, 2006

Benefits payable to workers who retire at the full retirement age and to disabled workers are equal to 100% of the PIA (subject to any applicable deductions). At the full retirement age, widow(er)s’ benefits are also payable at 100% of the insured worker’s PIA. Nondisabled widow(er)s can receive reduced benefits at age 60. Disabled widow(er)s can receive reduced benefits at age 50. Spouses, children, and parents receive a smaller proportion of the worker’s PIA than do window(er)s.

Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

Unlike Social Security, SSI is a program providing benefits based upon need to individuals who are aged, blind or disabled. The person’s countable income and resources must be below specific levels. Currently, countable resources may not exceed $2,000.00 for individuals, and $3,000.00 for a couple.

The medical disability requirements are the same for both Social Security Disability and SSI.

SSI Program

The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program provides income support to needy persons aged 65 or older, blind, or disabled children. Eligibility requirements and federal payment standards are nationally uniform. SSI replaced the former federal payment standards are nationally uniform. SSI replaced the former federal/state adult assistance programs in the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Payments under SSI began in January 1974, with 3.2 million persons receiving federally administered payments. By December 1974, this number had risen 4 million and remained at about that level until the mid-1980’s, then rose steadily, reaching nearly 6 million in 1993 and 7 million by the end of 2004. As of December 2006, the number of recipients was 7.2 million. Of this total, 4.2 million were between the ages of 18 and 64, 2 million were aged 65 or older, and 1.1 million were under age 18.

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